How to perfect the one-timer

one timers

by Jeremy Rupke on February 16, 2012

The one-timer is a great shot if you can do it properly, it is also a great way to embarrass yourself on the ice if you don’t know how to do it properly. There is nothing worse than completely missing the puck, or sending a muffin towards the net that the goalie easily gloves. In this article and video we will share a number of tips on how to perfect the one timer.

Important note: If you do not know how to take a slapshot, do not even attempt one-timers, it is crucial that you know how to take a decent slap shot before you can learn how to take a one timer. For help with your slapshot check out our article on how to take a slapshot. If you already have a grasp of the slapshot then check out our article and video filled with slapshot tips and our other article and video on increasing slapshot power.

One-Timer Video

In this video we talk about three different types of one-timers, they include standing still, skating, and skating backwards. We also share a little trick at the end on how to go top shelf with a one timer from in close to the net.

Tips for Practicing the One Timer

  • You need to know how to take a slapshot before you will be able to have a good one timer
  • The key to a good one timer involves two things, timing and body positioning
  • One Timer Timing
    • When timing your shot you need to read how fast the puck is coming at you, you want to strike the puck just like you would with a regular slapshot but when the puck is moving this requires some good timing.
    • When you start practicing your timing start with slow passes, and low wind-ups. Don’t try to kill the puck every time, just try to connect with it
    • After you get better you can try bigger wind-ups and faster passes, soon you should be able to connect with almost any pass
    • If the puck is coming at you slow, you can take your time with the wind up
    • If the puck is coming at you fast you need a fast wind-up and you will need to start your swing a bit earlier (so that you can connect with the puck in that perfect area)
  • One Timer Body Positioning
    • You will only have a few seconds to adjust your body position once you see the puck coming towards you. You need to ensure that you receive the pass in the “slapshot zone” in order to get the one timer off properly. Remember where you normally hit the puck with a regular slapshot, and try to move your body so that you get the puck in that zone.
    • Adjusting your body position involves taking a stride forwards, backwards or to the sides, if you get a bad pass do not be afraid to bail on the one timer. It is better to just catch the pass and go for a normal shot, than missing the puck, or sending a really weak shot on net.

Dropping the Knee in a One-Timer

A popular trick that some players do to get the puck up high with a one-timer is to drop their knee (We show you how to do this move in the video above). This allows the play to get under the puck and lift it up quickly, while still allowing them to put power on the shot. Brett Hull made this move popular near the end of his career and soon a lot of other NHL players were doing it. Take a look at the video below.

Brett Hull uses this move at 1:08 2:27 6:56

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Jeremy Rupke

Coach
Hi my name is Jeremy. I LOVE hockey and I am passionate about improving and helping others improve. My goal is to break every hockey skill down into easy to understand articles and videos. I explain everything step-by-step to help others improve. If you want to learn more about me you can read my about page. Thanks for reading and sharing!

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Ed June 15, 2013 at 11:37 am

Hi guys. I’m having some trouble connecting cleanly on one-timers (I.e. I’m whiffing or only getting pieces of the puck). In addition to just practicing more to improve my timing, I’m also not sure if I should be focusing on the puck coming to me the entire time and using my peripherals to aim at the net or focusing on the net and using my peripherals to receive the pass or some combination of the two. Please help me stop embarrassing myself :)

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johnny March 29, 2012 at 3:31 pm

in the wings video why did you only show Hull scoring

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Rory February 17, 2012 at 8:02 pm

Lov u guys

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