Turning: How to turn better in Hockey

tight turns in hockey

by Jeremy Rupke on March 5, 2014

Turning is one of the fundamental skills that every hockey player needs to learn. Sure you might be able to turn, but how well can you do it? There is a big difference in a slow gradual and off balance turn VS a quick, tight, sharp turn. In this video and article we are giving you the information you need to start performing better turns.

How to Turn in Hockey


The Basics of a good turn

For a good turn you want to use both skates. Sure you can still turn with only one skate on the ice, but with two blades on the ice you will be more balanced, and be able to turn at higher speeds. Below is a breakdown of the turn

  • If you are turning left, lead with your left foot. If you are turning right, lead with your right foot
  • With a staggered stance, most of the weight will be on the outside leg, and your inside skate will be there for extra balance and to help you get lower (and a tighter turn)
  • With both feet on the ice you can use both edges, rather than just one
  • When you are coming out of the turn, use a few crossovers to accelerate out and keep your speed.
  • Throughout the turn you should maintain balance, you can do this by staying low, and having a good base (feet are not too close together)

NHL Examples

duchene protect puck tight-turn
Matt Duchene is performing a nice tight turn, he has a good base and a staggered stance. This staggered stance helps Duchene get a better turn, but also protect the puck from the defender!

datsyuk tight turn
Here is Pavel Datsyuk in the NHL Skills Competition. Notice how the hands are away from the body, the stick leads Datsyuk through the turn, and he is nice and low with both blades on the ice. As Datsyuk completes this turn he can execute crossovers from this position and keep his speed.

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